Now Playing Tracks

daily reminder that the boy you’re in love with at 16 probably won’t matter when you’re 25.

daily reminder that the math test you failed your freshman year of high school probably won’t matter when you’re graduating college.

daily reminder that the problems you’re facing today may seem like the worlds end, but they will not matter in a year.

daily reminder that you’re going to be okay.

everything is going to be okay.

(Source: theperksofbeing-kate)

thekidshouldseethis:

This commercial features a 2,100 gallon pool of the cornstarch and water mixture known as oobleck, one of our favorite non-newtonian fluids. It was filmed in Kuala Lumpur by KIX for a Malaysian bank.

There are more creative commercials in the archives, including Music from a Tree by Diego Stocco and Burt’s Bees, Yuki Ariga’s Tissue Paper Animals for Nepia, and one of our favorites: NTT Docomo’s forest xylophone.

Thanks, @cosentino.

scinerds:

Rainbow Fragments on Spider Webs

The entangled pearl necklaces pictured above are actually droplets of dew on a spider web.

The subtle colors displayed here resulted when sunlight illuminated the web, creating a multitude of rainbow fragments. Note that, in general, the smaller dew drops, residing on the thinnest silk strands, are nearly colorless.

With these smaller drop sizes, wave interference acts to diminish coloration because colors tend to overlap one another.

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

On a recent trip to G.E., the Slow Mo Guys used their high-speed camera to capture some great footage of dyed water on a superhydrophobic surface. Upon impact, the water streams spread outward, flat except for a crownlike rim around the edges. Then, because air trapped between the liquid and the superhydrophobic solid prevents the liquid from wetting the surface, surface tension pulls the water back together. If this were a droplet rather than a stream, it would rebound off the surface at this point. Instead, the jet breaks up into droplets that scatter and skitter across the surface. There’s footage of smaller droplets bouncing and rebounding, too. Superhydrophobic surfaces aren’t the only way to generate this behavior, though; the same rebounding is found for very hot substrates due to the Leidenfrost effect and very cold substrates due to sublimation.  As a bonus, the video includes ferrofluids at high-speed, too. (Video credit: The Slow Mo Guys/G.E.)

better than light shows.

sci-universe:

This new Hubble image is the best-ever view of the Tarantula Nebula, a region full of star clusters, glowing gas, and dark dust. Astronomers are exploring and mapping this nebula as part of the Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project, in a bid to try to understand its starry anatomy. The Tarantula Nebula is located in one of our closest galactic neighbours, the Large Magellanic Cloud.

To Tumblr, Love Pixel Union